Teaching Resource Book

My aim is to enable children to enrich their experience of the deeper themes from the main novel Arty Tardy.

The activities and workshops are easily adaptable for use both in KS1 and KS2 and employ a cross-curricular approach which combines Literacy, PHSE and A.R.T.S.

The Arty Tardy Pilot Scheme was first introduced in East London with participating schools in Newham, Barking and Dagenham and Redbridge.

I hope this teaching resource will inspire many more people to have lively and meaningful interactions and that the outcomes will be positive and enlightening.Teaching Resource cover.png

ARTY TARDY Pilot Scheme in Primary Schools

Arty TardyI am spearheading a pilot scheme across three boroughs using ARTY TARDY as an educational tool in order to promote inclusion.

Three schools from Newham, Dagenham and Redbridge have expressed an interest and have started reading the book with children.  The hope is that it can help to integrate SEN pupils and promote understanding of Autism and in particular Asperger. There has already been some excellent feedback with pupils and parents who have connected with the book and for whom it has made a difference.

It has also just been selected by a school as a resource to fulfil the Inclusivity Module for their QuILT Accreditation  – great news!

There is a PHOTO SHOOT next week where I look forward to meeting pupils, reading the book with them and having a Q&A session!

I’ll keep you updated about future news/media interest as it comes in.

Don’t forget to check out the Children’s Review page on my website to read what some of the children have to say!

http://www.kittyclairmont.com/index.asp?pageid=603505

Developing Writing for Different Purposes: Teaching about Genre in the Early Years by Jean Baudrillard, David Reedy

This AAAAAis a book that charts young children’s early attempts to write as they struggle to communicate meaning for a variety of purposes. Each section deals with the appropriate research evidence on the development of children’s competence in literacy, and their growing awareness of genre, and uniquely, with a clear approach to teaching children from three to seven years. The text combines the necessary theoretical underpinning plus the day-to-day practical experience of working with young children in order to develop their understanding of the different forms and language of texts.

Teaching Grammar, Punctuation and Spelling in Primary Schools by David Waugh, Claire Warner, Rosemary Waugh

teachimg graHow do you teach grammar, punctuation and spelling in primary schools in a way that sparks children’s interest? Trainee and beginning teachers often find the teaching of grammar, punctuation and spelling especially challenging as they are not confident in their own knowledge. This book explores and provides the subject knowledge you will need to teach grammar, punctuation and spelling and gives guidance on how to teach it. It helps you to build confidence in your own knowledge, opening up the subject and enabling them to approach teaching with ease. Examples of effective lessons show you how to engage children’s interest in some of the more formal aspects of writing and throughout, activities and practical examples demonstrate how you can translate this learning into the classroom.

London Picture Book – Reading For Pleasure

kittyclairmont · March 27, 2013
(Not a new post just re-edited)

I recently presented my book review on Paddington at the Palace by Michael Bond, illus R.W for inclusion in the virtual collection of picture books by University of East London Primary PGCE trainee teachers….fantastic learning opportunity.

It was a wonderful experience, even though it was nerve racking! A real privilege to be part of it.

http://londonpicturebook.wordpress.com/

paddington

Literature search on improving boys’ writing by Daly

Literature search on improving boys’ writing by Daly, Caroline, Office for Standards in Education (OFSTED)Office for Standards in Education (OFSTED), corp creators. (2002) Literature search on improving boys’ writing.

This review considers the findings of recent literature on boys’ writing in Key Stages 1–4 in England, and refers to related literature from other parts of the United Kingdom, Europe, Australia and North America. It also includes some reference to the Reception year of the Foundation Stage.
(I have highlighted text for my own use)